Black Cherry of the Rio Grande (E. involucrata)

$ 2,80

The Black COTRG, also known as Barapiroca or Cereja do mato, is a species native to the Atlantic Forest and montane semideciduous forests of Brazil, thriving along riverbanks. This resilient tree, reaching heights of 5 to 10 meters, boasts a cylindrical crown and dark green, papery leaves with acute apices. It blooms with white flowers, yielding fruits from September to November. Withstanding temperatures as low as -6 degrees Celsius, it adapts well to various soil types and requires minimal care. Its fruits, harvested after 2 to 3 years of planting, are versatile, perfect for fresh consumption or culinary delights like cakes and jams. Additionally, its blossoms attract pollinators, making it an excellent choice for urban landscaping.

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Description

Introducing the Black COTRG, also known as Barapiroca, Caviúna, Cereja do mato, and Cereja do Rio Grande, a captivating fruit species native to the Atlantic Forest and montane semideciduous forests of Brazil. This small tree, reaching heights of 5 to 10 meters, boasts a cylindrical crown with branches featuring greenish sub-bark. With its distinctive bark peeling annually to reveal a temporary greenish hue, and dark green, papery leaves, this species adds ornamental charm to any landscape. Flowering in early spring, the blossoms, characterized by two bracts at the base of the calyx, give way to fruits from September to November. Resilient to temperatures as low as -6 degrees Celsius, the Black COTRG thrives in various soil types, from sandy to loamy, provided they are deep, moist, and neutral. Planting a minimum of two trees ensures optimal fruit production, with fruits appearing 2 to 3 years after planting. Seeds, rounded with a flat side, germinate in 40 to 60 days when sown in a substrate mixture of soil, sand, and organic matter. Ideal planting time is from September to October, with a spacing of 6 x 6 meters between trees. Regular watering in the first three months after planting, and subsequent organic compost fertilization, encourages healthy growth and fruiting. Harvesting from September to November, the fruits, enjoyed fresh or used in various culinary delights like cakes, juices, and jams, offer a unique and flavorful experience. Additionally, the tree’s flowers attract pollinators, making it suitable for urban landscaping.

Additional information

Characteristics

Indigenous to the Atlantic Forest and montane semideciduous forests of Brazil, typically found along riverbanks.

Characteristics:

Tree size: 5 to 10 meters tall with a cylindrical crown.
Bark: Peels annually, revealing a temporary greenish hue.
Leaves: Dark green, papery, oblong-shaped, with an acute apex.
Flowers: White, with two bracts at the base of the calyx.
Fruiting Season: September to November.
Cold Tolerance: Resilient to temperatures as low as -6 degrees Celsius.
Cultivation Tips:

Adaptable to various soil types, including sandy, loamy, and clay soils.
Requires deep, moist soil with a neutral pH (5.0 to 6.2).
Best planted in pairs for optimal fruit production.
Begins fruiting 2 to 3 years after planting.
Seeds germinate in 40 to 60 days in a substrate mixture of soil, sand, and organic matter.
Planting Instructions:

Spacing: 6 x 6 meters between trees.
Recommended planting time: September to November.
Initial watering every fifteen days for the first three months.
Cultivation Practices:

Pruning for crown formation and removal of basal shoots.
Organic compost fertilization for healthy growth.
Uses:

Fruits are harvested from September to November.
Suitable for fresh consumption or used in culinary preparations such as cakes, juices, and jams.
Flowers attract pollinators, making it ideal for urban landscaping.

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